Travel Asia
Aeroplane Etiquette

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Photo credit: { pranav } / Foter / CC BY

When traveling by air, you’re sometimes forced to rub elbows (literally) with people you don’t know. In close quarters and for extended periods of time, a little consideration can go a long way to make a flight as smooth as possible for both yourself and others (and to avoid dirty looks).

Carry your bag in front of you and low to the ground as you walk down the aisle in search of your seat. Holding it up and at your sides will inevitably knock seated passengers on their arms, shoulders, and heads. You can pull it along if it has wheels.

Utilize the overhead space above your own seat row but don’t hog the overhead bin. Do not place your bags in the overhead at the front of the plane unless you are sitting in that row. Don’t put your bag in a bin near the front of the plane for a quick exit — it means someone else will have to wait until the entire plane has emptied to walk back to get their bag. Taking the storage space of other passengers is rude and can potentially delay departure as they search for storage.

Keep your chair upright at least until you’re told it can be reclined. Don’t lean your chair back as soon as you get on. When you do recline your chair, do it slowly. If you are traveling with one or more children, keep a close eye on them. Children have a tendency to bump, kick, or yank the seat in front of them without realizing it throughout the flight, which can make the person in front of them very uncomfortable.

Don’t fight the flight attendants over electronics. The ban on the use of electronic devices during takeoff and landing may be absurd but it was not created by the flight attendants so giving them a hard time is obnoxious, and just delays the plane getting to cruising altitude.

Don’t get drunk during (or before) the flight. You may be having the time of your life, but your fellow passengers may not think so. You open the door to annoying everyone around you, reeking of booze, and needing to get up to use the lavatory every 20 minutes.

Avoid grabbing the back of the seat in front of you. Grabbing the seat back as you walk in the aisle or in your row, can be unpleasantly jarring to the person sitting in it. Copy the flight attendants who balance themselves in the aisle by grabbing the luggage compartments above their heads, rather than the seat backs.

Respect personal space. No matter how much you love to make new friends on the plane, the person next to you might rather get some work done, or simply may not feel like being chatty. If a friendly comment gets a minimal answer, take the hint and leave them alone.

Only get up at convenient times. Plan bathroom breaks. If you see a flight attendant with a cart in the aisle, stay put. You could easily end up with the cart between you and your seat and depending on the flight attendant, you’ll be stuck in the aisle until the service is complete, or delay service so the cart can back up and you can sit back down.
Respect the lavatory; don’t take a lot of time and don’t make a mess. There are probably people waiting to get in there, and they deserve a clean lavatory as much as you do.

Be considerate of other passengers when you exit the plane. Resist the urge to push your way out first; let those nearest the exit disembark the plane first. When your turn comes, move quickly so people with connecting flights can make it in time.

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Travel Asia is a tour agency that specialises in customised, all-inclusive tours throughout China and Asia. We create adventurous, reliable and cost-effective customised tours for Australians wanting to travel throughout Asia.

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